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andouillette

007_andouillette

Everything you hear about French food is mostly true. It really is great. However, I suffered my first ever food defeat in Paris. We sat down to have lunch at a lovely little cafe on the Boulevard Saint-Germain. It was a beautiful day, the sun was shining, and I was moved to try something new from the menu. Chitterling sausage with sauted potatoes and a mustard sauce sounded good to me, and it looked good when it arrived. I cut into the sausage and squirmy things oozed out, spilling onto my plate. It looked disgusting, but I persevered and ate a mouthful. The 'whatever it was' sausage had an unpleasant flavour. It tasted ever so slightly off to me. To make matters worse, the texture, oh, the texture...Slimy and chewy and...Anyway, I decided that I really needed to have another mouthful, just to be sure that I didn't like it. This one tasted and felt just the same. Absolutely horrible. I decided that I really needed to have a third mouthful...This was the one that did it. I started chewing, but it was all I could do to stop myself from gagging, so I quickly swallowed it. I really had no idea what it was that I was eating, but I guessed that if they were serving it for lunch in a busy little cafe in the middle of Paris it couldn't be that odd. Turns out that Andouillette is a tripe sausage, and a very traditional French dish. I've never eaten tripe before, and I don't think I ever will again. Don't be put off by this little tale. Next time you are in Paris, try the Andouillette. You might like it.

mr mcmuffin on 13 Oct 2005 @ 10:03 PM ✲ Permalink

Comments

Oh ducky!!! I could have warned you, I SHOULD have warned you. Andouille everywhere else in the world is NOT andouille in France.
Damn those culinary purists.

Posted by: jo | 13 Oct 2005 22:52:19

I had this in Paris too, last year. It was in a little café in the uni district with a very odd revolving door and walls so brown it looked like Simone de Beauvoir had coughed up her smoker's lung. It caught my eye on the menu, too. "Qu'est qu'cé?" I asked the waitress. "A very interesting sausage," she shot back, which seemed like an adequate description. The taste was just as you described it but I thought it was a stuffed goose's neck, or something similar.

Posted by: David.2 | 14 Oct 2005 07:45:52

When I saw the picture, I thought it was fish, chips and Chinese curry sauce. WhenI read what it was YUK.

Posted by: Keith | 14 Oct 2005 08:03:49

I thought it was going to be the phallus of a large beast. It even looks like it. In a beastly way. (Not that I'm an expert, might I add...)

Bet you definitely won't be eating it again now!

Posted by: David (TEFL Smiler) | 14 Oct 2005 13:06:53

This is why I stick to vegetables.
Thanks for the card, btw, it arrived today. Mrs Carrots thought you'd named the Mini McMuffin Dave. She's a bit slow, you know.

Posted by: Steve | 14 Oct 2005 13:37:06

Brilliant.....at least I'm not the only one who chooses dodgy food in Paris. The raw liver probably wouldn't have been so bad if I didn't incubate liver cells for a living!

Posted by: Mrs Carrot Cake | 15 Oct 2005 11:34:19

I tired this stuff in Champeix, France. Good Lord... I will never get over it. There were two forms. One was a tripe stew... horrible... and the other was the actual sausage. This was the vilest thing I ever ate. Unfortunately we came across it in other forms in France, we idn't recognize it and thinking it was ham rolled with cramcheese, tried it again. Talk about putrid... A taste never to be forgotten

Posted by: susan lipsett | 10 Nov 2005 22:39:43

Hmmm.... well at least you can say you tried it - more than most have dared.
I had it by mistake in a small town in southern france a decade ago as a twenty-one year old. Me and 4 mates were on our way to the south of france for a month of fun and we stopped in a town on the way; it was Bastille day and the town square was packed that evening. There was a guy in the middle of the square barbequeing different types if sausages and we all ordered one. EWveryone else got this bratwurst type thing but i ordered the largest type and was told it was andouillette. I was happily chomping away in the dark square, watching the fireworks - I must admit it tasted superb, meaty and peppery and nicely smoked from the barbie. I took a bite when a large rocket exploded and filled the sky with light and saw for the first time what i had been eating; tubey/veiny rubbery innards - not a pretty sight. However, i soldiered on and it was without a doubt, a culinary delight.
Our local french bistro in London serves them with mustard sauce and I often pop in - they are just wonderful. Needless to say Im almost the only englishman that does!
I would recommend one over ANYthing from McDonalds ANYDAY. At least you know whats in it.!

Posted by: ADDLED | 2 Feb 2006 21:54:45

WOW! You are my hero. I can't imagine anyone who wasn't brought up on the stuff actually liking it. It takes all sorts, I guess...

Posted by: mr mcmuffin | 4 Feb 2006 09:07:53

It looks, smells and tastes of poo. I'm sure the French just put excrement in a sausage skin and offer it to Brits whilst they laugh up their froggy sleeves.

Posted by: TonyW | 7 Apr 2006 09:02:40

Me and andouillettes go back a long way - andouille is not quite the same BTW.

I asked what they were, got une réponse honnête, plucked up courage to eat one and have been a fan ever since.

Those thatched-rooved cheapo restaurants Courte Paille do a super andouillette and chips! Yum!

Actually, it's not intestine but stomach. The funny smell is cooked gastric juices (amino acids?).

Posted by: Jonathan Walker | 8 May 2006 17:56:30

Accidentally ordered one in Gallerie Lafayette, Nice. Well, I ate it, although I probably never will order it again. But the others in the table didn't like the odour at all. Yes, I had the dictionary, but didn't bother to check...

Posted by: Antti Louko | 31 Jul 2006 10:59:50

WEll, I've just returned from Paris where I had my first Andouillete experience and I can safely assure anyone that it will be my last. I was feelign adventorous and it looked so damned nice on the pic on the menu, but as soon as I cut it open the smell!!! Clean took my appetite waay and that of the three other Englanders sharing the table.

I agree with Mr. Mcmuffin and thank god for strong beer!

Posted by: Kev The Toad | 27 Sep 2006 19:33:31

Just back from Dinan in Brittany where I had andouille with odd mustardy creamy sauce and shoe-string fries. The restaurant did have english translations, but having never heard of chitterling sausage before I was none the wiser. I must say I thought it was quite nice (although copious amounts of muscadet may have swayed my opinion); Bit like smoked german sausage or similar. I did wonder what the wiggly things were, was trying to remember what the french word for worms was as i thought it may have been a descriptive term.

Pulled out my huge French/English dictionary this morning and found that the entry simply said chitterling sausage again. Clearly a job for Google, and here I am. Mmmm, tripe - nowhere near as bad as the tripe stew I had whilst living near Chartres though, the memory of furry stomach meat floating in its own greasy juice is etched in my mind forever I fear, although thankfully I no longer remember the exact taste/smell.

Posted by: Liz Hill | 3 Oct 2006 13:11:03

This post and comments are too funny -- enjoyable reading. :-) I just tried andouillette for the first time last night and loved it, but I was brought up eating Italian blood sausage (our family calls it salam' di fidic', I can't de-Calabrese-ify it enough to find it on Google), which tastes somewhat similar. I can understand people not liking it. The smell takes getting used to, I'm sure, if you haven't smelled it all your life.

Posted by: Chris T. | 17 Nov 2006 14:42:07

I love Cajun andouille, and Cajun's are of French heritage. So when I saw andouillettes on the menu at a restaurant along the Nivernais I wanted to try it. The waitress stubbornly refused to allow me to order it, so I order yet-another-steak, but this one with cepes. It turns out to have been a doubly good choice because I think it was the best steak I've ever eaten, and because I later learned what andouillettes look like and are made of. I'm not a prissy eater. I grew up eating tripe sandwiches. But that doesn't mean I have to like it. I could eat termites, too, if I needed to do so to survive, but such was not my need at that time. :-)

Posted by: Brian Godfrey | 7 Feb 2007 20:21:57

Yea. Andouille and Andouillette are NOT the
same. Day 2 of assembling a cassoulet and
time to cook sausages. These gray sausages
look funny, smell funny, fall apart and have
odd looking ingredients. Turns out it's basically offal and not the kick ass punctuation necessary at all. Back to the store for some actual andouille. The shopkeeper could have warned us knowing it was going into a cassoulet.

Posted by: Harry Dawson | 3 Mar 2007 19:05:45

I decided to be adventurous in a restaurant in Paris the other day and ordered an Andouillette sausage. All I knew was that it was made of Chitterlings. I thought these sounded like a kind of bird. I'll never forget the horror of discovering what they really are. Nor will I ever forget the foul putrid taste, smell and texture. Not wanting to be rude I forced myself to eat two thirds of it after begging my friend to eat some of it for me. He decided to just concentrate on his beautifully cooked sirloin.

Posted by: Tom | 5 Mar 2007 16:44:52

Been there. Done that. Never again...

Posted by: andy | 22 Mar 2007 11:58:11

I can never get enough of the stuff since my hates the smell. She's off to dine with friends tonight so I rushed out to buy a pair, to eat with chips.

Lets not get started on Marmite!

Hint: the French eat it with strong mustard and lots of cracked pepper to cover the smell.

Posted by: Brian | 5 Apr 2007 16:08:27

Like many of the others here. I have just made the mistake of ordering Andouillette for lunch.

I am working in Normandy for two weeks and trying all the local delicacies! I had the choice between steak and andouillette. Well, I have had steak before and decided to be different. My stomach is made of cast iron and ate, only the other day, medium rare veal kidney.

WELL!!!! I smelt this dish coming before I saw it. It was put in front of me and the overwhelming smell of excrament hit my nostrils. My three other colleagues English, Belgian and American were not overly impressed with the smell. The sausage was pre cut and I had slices of the stuff on a plate. I managed one mouthful which was a very very strong pig flavour. The second mouthful made me gag and then I had a potato which had the same effect.

Well, at least I have tried it but I can safely say never again!!!!!

Posted by: Andy | 14 Jun 2007 13:46:29

I made the monumental mistake of ordering one of these last week, in a service station somewhere between Orleans and Paris. I just thought it would be a regional sausage, maybe spicy? Foolishly, I ordered it without the mustard.

The waiter brought what appeared to be a plate of steaming cow dung cunningly disguised as a mishapen sausage. In a rare display of French pity, he had brought the mustard anyway, in a little bowl on the side of the plate. Starving and thinking that it couldn't possibly taste as bad as it smelt, I tucked in with great gusto. At this point, words fail me. It was, without question or competition, the foulest thing I have ever eaten, or at least tried to eat. TonyW wrote "it looks, smells and tastes of poo" and I can't improve on that. I was so desperately hungry that I managed force down just over half of it before the gagging reflex kicked in and I admitted defeat. If I live a very bad life and end up in hell, at least I'll know what's for dinner.

Posted by: Andy Platt | 8 Jul 2007 20:25:14

I find this story quite amusing as I had the same experience in Chartres. I thought I would try the french delicacy even though I knew what it was before ordering. I was really surprised by the aroma and the overall taste of the sausage itself. I've eaten similar entrail-type dishes before but this one was undoubtedly the worst smelling and tasting.

Then again, I really like to eat perserved duck eggs (a Chinese delicacy) which I'm sure others do not like. So to those who covet the smelly sausage, I salute you!

Posted by: bigbear | 23 Jul 2007 08:38:32

Once Taseted never forgoten never never again the taste and smell.

Posted by: T Bowen | 31 Jul 2007 14:16:42

Obviously all of us have beeen thru the ordeal and want to find the comfort of others having suffered the same pain.
The different descriptions of the experience I have read here are a fantastic summary of what I felt when I tried that sausage that was described to me by the waitress as "different".
I wonder why french people still cook this, I would be genuinely interested in understanding what is so good about this dish that makes people keep preparing and eating it.
Whatever it is, I am travelling again next week to Paris, and I just can't wait to recommend this delicacy to my friends... It will be so much fun to see their faces...

Posted by: jose | 3 Aug 2007 22:02:31

you know....i just had the very experience that you spoke of there and felt compelled enough to find out about Andouilette.

absolutely revolting.

Posted by: Iain | 31 Aug 2007 12:29:06

OK guys here is the frenchman comment. When in france, don't have just any cheap andouillette. Either have it in a typical countryside place, or is Paris only get those who have the AAAAA label (it means that is has been produced according to high quality standards). Bad andouillette is disgusting even for hard-core french tripe eaters (such as myself).

Posted by: Laurent | 12 Sep 2007 11:15:16

Absolutely gorgeous stuff, no idea what the fuss is about, but like many things (including e.g. whisky or coke) it IS a bit of a acquired taste. Just because something looks odd (in lumps, rather than the usual English mushed up sausage bits which could be anything) and smells a bit unusual (a bit like the animal, rather than some sanitised lump of flesh in shrink wrapped plastic) doesn't mean it's bad or unpleasant. It just means it's something you're not used to. Someone said it smells putrid, it doesn't - I have had more than enough experience of putrid and it's far from similar. Someone else said it's like poo, sorry but I would draw the line at poo and I'm perfectly happy eating this stuff. But it is an acquired taste if you're used to so many things tasting like bland chicken. Get out there and be adventurous, I promise it doesn't hurt.

Posted by: paul | 14 Sep 2007 16:47:24

P.S. Just seen bigbear's comment: "Then again, I really like to eat preserved duck eggs (a Chinese delicacy)...". If you mean thousand-year-eggs, I have tried those too, and they truly are disgusting. Bigbear, I salute you back.

Posted by: paul | 14 Sep 2007 17:00:23

It's actually pretty interesting to see how the English, whose cuisine has an extremely bad reputation, are finally pretty narrow-minded about different food... ;)
Someone is wondering why the French are still cooking this thing... Well it's simply because we like it. And don't think you're adventurous because you try it! You should have a swedish surströmming (fermented herring). THIS is hardcore! ha ha!
There is nothing better than having an andouillette AAAAA in a Parisian café-brasserie with mustard and chips. Plus snails for appetizer! (fucking nightmare for a non-french! hahaha!)

PS: Andy wrote: "Hint: the French eat it with strong mustard and lots of cracked pepper to cover the smell."
Wrong, it's because andouillette is good with mustard (like every sausage) and must have pepper... We like the original taste and don't want to cover the smell! (I know, how sick...)

Posted by: Victor | 6 Oct 2007 00:36:20

I have been duped twice by this culinary curiosity, and both times by the same restaurant in Chablis. Having confidently asserted it to be a species of fish to my wife, ordered it for myself and lived the gastronomic horror of the uninitiated as colourfully described passim, we collectively made the same faux pas a year later when she was in search of something to accompany a fine premier cru. Perhaps we will remember next time...

Posted by: James | 12 Oct 2007 13:39:00

I have been duped twice by this culinary curiosity, and both times by the same restaurant in Chablis. Having confidently asserted it to be a species of fish to my wife, ordered it for myself and lived the gastronomic horror of the uninitiated as colourfully described passim, we collectively made the same faux pas a year later when she was in search of something to accompany a fine premier cru. Perhaps we will remember next time...

Posted by: James | 12 Oct 2007 13:39:19

Who the hell are you closed minded t**t heads? No wonder everyone hates us english! Im 22 years old. I was a veggie for the first 20 years of my live. I started to eat meat in France, Andouillette being one of the first meat dishes I tried. I found it delicious. Think I have been really lucky in learning to appreciate meat in a country where they cook meat rather than cremate it. Think that the majority of ppl who have commented on this website should stick to their beans on toast and their Britain Abroad bull crap! I wonder the age and class of you all, you all sound like middle aged, middle-upper class ijiots.

Posted by: Jenna | 13 Oct 2007 15:27:34

andouillette? NEVER again and probably the biggest culinary blunder so far! My brother and I were staying in a very rural part of the Loire Valley this summer with our families, local eatery doubled up as the village shop. First night all went to the restaraunt, they all had pizza, we thought it would be nice to "go local" and asked the waitress what andouillette was to which she replied a kind of sausage ( BROKEN ENGLISH) Well, we smelled it before we even saw it, mine arrived and I cut it open and gagged - the smell and look of it will remain with me for ever - -i plucked up courage and popped a bit in my mouth and bery quickly popped it out again, uugh!! Never have i tasted anything as revolting. My daughter was dispatched down the road to the bin with both andouillettes so as not to offend the owners! While we were there at least 3 other people, all locals, ordered this dish and consumed their andouillette with rellish - funny folk those French...! Before I get shot down in flames by all you gastranomes, I love trying different foods from around the place, but andouillette, non merci!

Posted by: Crawford Stirling | 15 Oct 2007 15:32:39

James must have lost every taste bud connected to his pea brain. To mention the taste of Andouillette in the same breath as that when describing prime cuts of meat is just plain stupid. Four of us sat down to dinner in Chablis last Friday and while three ate Veal Chops, which were sensational, one unfortunate ordered an AAAAA rated Andouillette. We do not exist on a diet of baked beans and visit France for its exceptional cuisine - like its salt marsh lamb, charolais beef, bresse chicken etc, but the smell alone of this so-called delicacy left us appalled and nauseous. If the smell of urine and faeces and the texture of veined slippery rubber is James's idea of what meat tastes like then I suggest he finds another butcher or takes himself off to the nearest hospital to have his taste and smell senses checked out .

Posted by: ROGER Kennedy | 28 Oct 2007 10:19:58

What a vomiting thing! One day after and I still feel nausea. Further we ordered one also for our little daughter... and the waiter did not advise us... What a souvenir from Paris!

Posted by: PTC | 10 Dec 2007 19:30:45

Yes I'm another one caught out by this awful dish...

3rd night in to a trip to Paris in a fantastic brasserie my fiance tried this dish...

As Wikipedia so eloquently puts it: "interesting challenge even for adventurous eaters who don't object to the taste or aroma of feces. "

Make no mistake those that are not repelled by this dish either have no sense of smell or are getting confused with the much milder Andouille sasuage...

It's made from the pig's colon what do you expect!

Posted by: Malcolm | 14 Jan 2008 15:15:05

Tried one of these years ago and the meory still abides. I conside myself fairly well educated and well travelled and I appreciate world cuisines but trust me tucking into a a hot sausage that to all intents and purposes liiks and smells like a shit ona plate is disgusting!

Posted by: Jock | 21 Jan 2008 12:16:35

Wow,
I have to agree with Jock. I recently moved to France and I am a lover of all things French but whoa! I don't care what you say or what you claim if you love this sausage then you must have no sense of smell and frankly no sense of taste. I have eaten many dishes from arounfd the Globe too and in all honesty I have never eaten nor smelled anything quite as disgusting as this before. It truly tastes awful and the smell is disgusting. It's one thing to be adventurous but to serve up something closely resembling and reeking like a big steaming jobby on a plate then claim it's haute cuisine is pretentious twaddle!

Posted by: Tam | 21 Jan 2008 14:47:54

I had some purchased in a fine charcuterie (butcher shop) in Normandy. I was with my French brother-in-law Vital. I was purchasing dinner for the night. I was them in the meat case and they looked attractive. "May I please have 8 of these?" And Vital leaned in close to me and said "I recommend about 2 of those". I did not know why. When we got them in the kitchen they were boiled and then grilled. No MacMuffin they are not tripe (which is a cows stomach), the contents of the sausage casing contained the chopped guts of a pig. I have been on pig farms, and I must say, that evening I sliced into a sausage that smelled and, well, tasted like the smell of pig manure, some of us on Stateside aptly call(s) SHIT! My mother-in-law enjoyed it and knew exactly what it was. It was avoided like the plague by other members of the family that night. Thankfully, I also asked the butcher for an assortment of brats & blood sausage and a number of eatible pates. VIVA LA DIFFERENCE!! Joe Coniglio, Robideau Farm-to-You, Delta, CO

Posted by: Joseph Coniglio | 18 Feb 2008 03:07:18

Well, for somebody who has been around enough feces in his life this is by far the most disgusting thing I have eaten. A dirty bunghole would be more appetizing. I was expecting something of the spicy New Orleans side. I ate three bites and was about to barf. I am glad to know that others have lived through it.

Posted by: Frederic | 26 Feb 2008 22:48:00

Had the abject misfortune to order an Andouillette AAAAA in a restaurant in Paris last November. I don't believe the many As make for a better dish. An Andouillette with not a single A after its name could not be any more revolting than the thing that arrived on my plate. I cannot believe anyone honestly likes this any more than they would enjoy eating a pan-fried dog t*rd. I naively ordered it after the restaurant owner told me it was "pork". I was looking forward to a succulent pork loin. I was already pretty disappointed to see an enormous, barely-grilled sausage heading my way, but this disappointment was nothing compared to my horror when I sliced into it. Cutting it open was like performing an autopsy. Chunks of rubbery, slimy, many-coloured raw stuff came spilling out of what I now know to be the rinsed-out tube of a pig's bottom. The eye-watering stench of excrement was barely masked by an overpowering smell of pepper. I tried one forkful but was nearly crying with the effort of trying to subdue my involuntary heaving. Even my husband, who will eat anything, couldn't help me. He was gagging too. The whole experience was stomach-churning. I cannot imagine why this thing was ever invented, or how anyone can truly claim to like it.

Posted by: Sarah | 1 Mar 2008 15:58:14

Oh my, finally a place to share andouillette stories. I consider myself to be well traveled and well versed in all culinary matters. If I don't know what it is, I WANT to eat it. Curiosity got the better of me last summer in Normandy. I actually ate andouillette three times; the first time was in Arras, it was served straight up in a great sauce. The second time was in Bayeux, served in a crepe with an egg on top. The final time it was served sliced on a toasted open faced sandwich with cheese and potatoes. Three things that I noticed; the strange texture, an unusual taste, and the smell. Parts had a grey tinge to it, and yes those squiggly white things were there too. I finally decided that I really didn't like it and picked it all of the sandwich, wrapped in in a napkin and stuffed it under my plate. My lunchmates could still smell it, and likened the odor to cigarette butts. Would I try it again? probably.......I also tried tripe stew, and couldn't get through that at all!

Posted by: Liz | 22 Mar 2008 15:51:41

Oh my, finally a place to share andouillette stories. I consider myself to be well traveled and well versed in all culinary matters. If I don't know what it is, I WANT to eat it. Curiosity got the better of me last summer in Normandy. I actually ate andouillette three times; the first time was in Arras, it was served straight up in a great sauce. The second time was in Bayeux, served in a crepe with an egg on top. The final time it was served sliced on a toasted open faced sandwich with cheese and potatoes. Three things that I noticed; the strange texture, an unusual taste, and the smell. Parts had a grey tinge to it, and yes those squiggly white things were there too. I finally decided that I really didn't like it and picked it all of the sandwich, wrapped in in a napkin and stuffed it under my plate. My lunchmates could still smell it, and likened the odor to cigarette butts. Would I try it again? probably.......I also tried tripe stew, and couldn't get through that at all!

Posted by: Liz | 22 Mar 2008 15:53:11

Oh my, finally a place to share andouillette stories. I consider myself to be well traveled and well versed in all culinary matters. If I don't know what it is, I WANT to eat it. Curiosity got the better of me last summer in Normandy. I actually ate andouillette three times; the first time was in Arras, it was served straight up in a great sauce. The second time was in Bayeux, served in a crepe with an egg on top. The final time it was served sliced on a toasted open faced sandwich with cheese and potatoes. Three things that I noticed; the strange texture, an unusual taste, and the smell. Parts had a grey tinge to it, and yes those squiggly white things were there too. I finally decided that I really didn't like it and picked it all of the sandwich, wrapped in in a napkin and stuffed it under my plate. My lunchmates could still smell it, and likened the odor to cigarette butts. Would I try it again? probably.......I also tried tripe stew, and couldn't get through that at all!

Posted by: Liz | 22 Mar 2008 15:53:55

I had some in Nice. It was simmered in wine and garlic for a long time before it was grilled. It was good. It helps to have onions on the side. I'd like to try to slow smoke some.

Now, when it comes to kidney--I gag.

Posted by: Mark | 23 Mar 2008 01:35:55

I could have written Mr McMuffin's post, my experience was that similar.

I tried chitterling in a mountain restaurant in La Plagne this year. I sent back a frankfurter and fries they'd accidently sent out, saying no, I ordered the chitterling, the one with the mustard sauce. What a fool! When I cut it open all this strange looking grey meat crap fell out (ever seen Empire Strikes Back? When Han Solo cut open that animal to keep warm? Enough said)

I only managed 2 mouthfuls before I had to stop eating what I can only describe as a whole world of hell on a plate. Never again!

Posted by: kal | 1 Apr 2008 12:22:54

I found this page wandering on the "Wikiproject food and drink" and, as a french man, I find it quite funny to see how foreigners face the infamous andouillette.
I have to say that I love this dish, it is actually one of my favorites. The taste is quite strong indeed but there are a few things that foreigners need to know in order to taste a good andouillette.
First, an andouillette is to be eaten grilled (on a pan, in an oven, or on a grill) and it has to be so cooked that the exterior skin is crunchy and the whole "structure" falls apart. In fact, the best andouillettes I have ever eaten didnt have the shape of a sausage at all after having been cooked.
Then, you have to be very careful about the quality of the andouillette. It is easy to find a brasserie that serves a fairly good andouillette, but many of them can not cook it properly. My advice to the foreigners feeling adventurous and willing to try this delight is to have it in a restaurant chain, such as "La courte paille" or "hippopotamus", as they grill it perfectly most of the time. I like my andouillette with just a hint of strong moutarde, but there are many sauces that go along very good with it as well, such as mustard or pepper sauce.
Now, if you ever see on the menu of a restaurant that their andouillette is "AAAAA" accredited, go for that. The AAAAA (Association des Amis de l'Andouillette Authentique de l'Aube) is a non profit organization which goal is to promote the real, authentic french andouillette. The difference between a regular andouillette and an "AAAAA" is considerable.
And I have to confirm that andouillette is not the same thing as andouille. Andouille is much more spicy and peppery and is eaten cold, and it actually looks like a big sausage. The best places to eat good andouillettes and andouilles in France are Jargeau (Loiret), Vire (Britanny) and Guéméné (Normandy).

I hope I could help with all my andouillette experience and wish the best of luck to the culinary adventurers over the world. And don't forget this french proverb : "Dans le cochon, tout est bon !"

Posted by: Gautier | 16 Apr 2008 10:57:38

Holy crap. I cannot believe there is a website about andouillette. Even though my experience occurred over twelve years ago, I have never forgotten thet most foul and horrendous dish. While visiting Paris in 1996, my wife and I had dinner at a quaint brasserie. I ordered what I believed to be the French version of andouille sausage (a south Louisiana favorite). However, what I received can be described as nothing other than a shit log. The only thing worse than this odious smell was the smug look on the waiter's face as he served the plate. Upon cutting into this turdlike substance, I was immediately assaulted by the smell of feces. Determined not to give the waiter any form of satisfaction, I ate the entire craplike dish. It appeared that the more I chewed, the larger this thing grew and the worse it smelled. Needless to say, you expel what you eat, sometimes sooner rather than later. I spent the rest of that romantic night in Paris on or near a toillette.

Posted by: Dan | 4 May 2008 07:19:00

Just to add on this topic...
I'm from Torino, Italy, where tripe is a cult-food. Here you can find a heavenly delicate tripe soup at the "Trattoria della Posta" (one of the best things I ever eat) or shaped like a fractal arabesque and cut in very thin slices and dressed with oil and lemon (the so-called "Trippa di Moncalieri" - a smaller city near Torino) in some other good restaurants.
In spite of being the base for such wonderful preparations, many people are horrified by the concept (including most ladies). This is just to say that I was a real tripe-fan, until I spent three days in Lyon, France, eating andouillette for two consecutive evenings...
The first evening I couldn't believe.
Now, after two andouillettes, I'm a believer.
NEVER EAT TRIPE IN FRANCE!!!!!!
Massimo
P.S. I do hope to forget the experience and to be able to look at the tripe with the same eyes as I did before. :-(((

Posted by: Massimo | 5 May 2008 00:58:54

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